Category Archives: Uncategorized

FEATURED MULTIRACIAL INDIVIDUAL: MEET STEVEN D. MCKIE


Steven D. McKie (My middle name is only a letter), age 26

 

WHAT MIX ARE YOU?

I’m French-Canadian Abenaki American Indian, African American, Italian, and Scottish!

 

WHERE DO YOU CURRENTLY LIVE?

San Francisco, CA

 

IS THE COMMUNITY YOU LIVE IN NOW DIVERSE?

No, goodness no.

 

WHERE DID YOU GROW UP?

I grew up in North Augusta, SC. Just a stone’s throw from Augusta, GA — where I was born. I grew up being the only light skin person in any of my classes. Aside from a few African American classmates, I was all alone until 8th grade when we moved to VA.

 

HOW DID YOUR PARENTS MEET?

Out with friends at a dance club/bar? If I remember correctly. They met in Georgia.

 

WERE THERE ANY SIGNIFICANT OBSTACLES IN THEIR RELATIONSHIP CORRELATED TO YOUR BACKGROUNDS?

Dad was black and from a mixed background himself, my Mom was lily white. They were raising mixed children in the 90s in small town in SC, so yeah, plenty of issues regarding race (from both their respective families)

Steven and his uncle
Steven and his uncle

HAS YOUR EXTENDED FAMILY ALWAYS BEEN SUPPORTIVE OF YOU BEING MULTIRACIAL?

Definitely have never heard anything negative. Then again, most on my Mom’s side don’t really speak with us. Mostly just the black side of our family that keeps in contact, even then only somewhat.

 

DID YOU CELEBRATE TRADITIONS FROM BOTH SIDES OF YOUR FAMILY?

Neither of my parents were ever religious. We never had any traditions outside of Thanksgiving, Halloween, Easter, and Christmas. Pretty much celebrated whatever was the standard, Christian norm. Though, we never set foot in church.

 

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT YOUR CULTURAL BACKGROUND?

The social culture of my African American side I am very proud of. I try not to pigeon hole myself down to one race though. All of me is equally as good.

 

WHAT ACTIONS DID YOUR PARENTS TAKE TO TEACH YOU ABOUT YOUR DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS?

Nothing, just that racist kids were rude to me because their parents don’t know any better. And, that one day it wouldn’t be that way.

 

DID YOU TALK ABOUT RACE A LOT IN YOUR HOUSEHOLD WHEN YOU WERE GROWING UP?

My Dad made a lot of race based jokes; but that’s only because he loved Richard Pryor and Steve Harvey 🙂

 

DO YOU IDENTIFY AS MIXED OR SOMETHING ELSE?

Just say I’m mixed, and what it is I’m mixed with. Just another American, with a fancy pigment.

 

DOES RACE WEIGH INTO WHO YOU CHOOSE TO DATE?

For the longest time it definitely did. My GF of ~5 years is actually white.

 

WHAT DOES BEING MIXED MEAN TO YOU?

It means being flexible and that I’m gifted with the ability to be a social chameleon.

 

DO YOU HAVE A LOT OF FRIENDS WHO ARE MIXED?

Kind of? I have a lot of friends from all over the world. Only a handful of actual mixed friends.

 

ARE THERE ANY COMMENTS YOU ARE REALLY TIRED OF HEARING FROM PEOPLE IN REGARDS TO RACE/CULTURE?

“You look basically white, so you’re white to us man.” I….what…ugh. Moving on.

 

WHAT IS YOUR DREAM FOR THE FUTURE OF AMERICA IN REGARDS TO RACE?

I dream of an America flushed with mixed-race babies. Racism is something that can be made a moot point if everyone, and their grandma, is mixed. It’s an inevitability. Until then, we’ll just enjoy paying less for sunscreen.

 

ANYTHING ELSE YOU WANT TO SHARE?

Never let anyone tell you you belong to a particular race or culture. If you are mixed, you are uniquely you. Not white, not black, not latino, not Chinese. You are an amalgamation of millions of years of selective breeding. Congratulations, you probably have some of the best genes in your friend group. Embrace it, stand together, and work to spread cross-cultural awareness.

 

You can follow Steven on Twitter / LinkedIn


 

 

 

 

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FEATURED MULTIRACIAL FAMILY: MEET THE SEESTONE-RAMIREZ FAMILY


MEET THE SEESTONE-RAMIREZ FAMILY

 

Annabella, age 22

Ecuadorian

African

Chinese

Swedish

Chris, age 22

Mexican

Leonardo, age 3

All of the above

WHERE DO YOU CURRENTLY LIVE?

Provo, Utah

 

IS THE COMMUNITY YOU LIVE IN NOW DIVERSE?

No. I live in a predominantly white neighborhood and community.

 

WHERE DID YOU GROW UP?

I grew up in Palo Alto California which was fairly diverse. There were definitely a lot of other mixed kids around and my three best friends of 16 years are all mixed.

  

HAS YOUR EXTENDED FAMILY ALWAYS BEEN SUPPORTIVE OF YOU BEING MULTIRACIAL/BIRACIAL?

I grew up with my mom’s family. I did not know my dad or his side of the family until I turned 18. It was always obvious that I was mixed, but no one else in my family is. I was the only one with brown eyes and most of my family has straight blonde hair. They were always supportive, but it was never really talked about.

 

DID YOU CELEBRATE TRADITIONS FROM BOTH SIDES OF YOUR FAMILY?

I only ever celebrated with my mom’s side. Just recently I have been getting to know my dad’s side of things.

 

WERE THERE MULTIPLE LANGUAGES SPOKEN IN YOUR HOUSEHOLD?

No. I only speak English. I am often mistaken for someone who speaks Spanish though.

WHAT DO YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT YOUR CULTURAL BACKGROUND?

When I met my dad he took me out to eat Ecuadorian food. It was amazing and I have loved it ever since. I have done a lot of research about my ethnicities and I would like to be more in tune with my dad’s side of things culturally.

 

WHAT ACTIONS DID YOUR PARENTS TAKE TO TEACH YOU ABOUT YOUR DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS?

When I met my dad he told me how important it is to know about my background on his side. My mom never really talked about it growing up.

 

DID YOU TALK ABOUT RACE A LOT IN YOUR HOUSEHOLD WHEN YOU WERE GROWING UP?

I did not have many conversations about race in my house because I didn’t really know that in other places in the country it wasn’t normal to be mixed. Where I grew up most people were either mixed or something other than white.

 

DO YOU IDENTIFY AS MIXED OR SOMETHING ELSE?

I usually identify as being Ecuadorian and White (Swedish).

 

DOES RACE WEIGH INTO WHO YOU CHOOSE TO DATE?

Race never had a play in who I dated. I ended up with a man who is full Mexican.

 

WHAT DOES BEING MIXED MEAN TO YOU?

I absolutely love being mixed. I love that no one looks like me. I don’t mind that people guess or ask what ethnicity I am. I am proud of being mixed. I love having the different cultures in my blood.

 

DO YOU HAVE A LOT OF FRIENDS WHO ARE MIXED?

Yes. I think all of my friends are mixed. I have learned that it doesn’t matter. It doesn’t matter what our skin colors are. If you are dark, then you are blessed. If you are as white as paper, you are blessed. I think that whatever you look like, you should own it.

 

ARE THERE ANY COMMENTS YOU ARE REALLY TIRED OF HEARING FROM PEOPLE IN REGARDS TO RACE/CULTURE?

I think my only pet peeve is when people ask if my hair is real. It is just kind of disrespectful in my opinion. I have worked really hard on my hair, so I love when it is complimented but I do not consider “I love your hair! Is it real?” as a compliment.

HAVE YOU FACED ANY OBSTACLES AS A MIXED RACE FAMILY?

My fiancé has experienced a few instances of profiling in our town. He is Mexican American and he has gotten pulled over for no reason and he gets some dirty looks when he is with me and see that we have a son together. I’m not sure if they assume I’m full white or not. My son is one of two Latino students in his pre school, but so far we have not experienced any obstacles there.

 

HAS YOUR CHILD ASKED ABOUT RACE?

No. I don’t think he is old enough to understand.

 

WHAT ACTIONS WILL YOU TAKE WHEN YOUR SON IS OLDER TO TEACH HIM ABOUT EACH OF HIS BACKGROUNDS?
Once we have the money, my fiancé and I are planning to travel. We want to show him (and ourselves) our different cultures. We will go to my fiancé’s parents house for Christmas eve and show our son the traditions of his family, while we will go to my parents for Thanksgiving and show him mine. I think that it is all about balance and teaching him to love and respect all cultures.

HOW WILL YOU RAISE YOUR CHILD TO HONOR DIVERSITY IN OTHERS?

I think first is to teach him not to judge other people especially based on skin color, religion or culture. I think starting young and teaching him this will allow him to grow up respecting other people and cultures.

 

WHAT UNIQUE CHARACTERISTICS DOES YOUR CHILD HAVE FROM YOU AND YOUR PARTNER?

Our son has my eyes and eye color. They are large and light brown. He has tanner skin and it gets pretty dark in the summer. He has my curly hair, but it is also really thick like my fiancés. I am very short (5’0) but it looks like he is getting my fiancé’s height. (6’0).

WHAT IS YOUR DREAM FOR YOUR CHILD’S FUTURE AND THE FUTURE OF AMERICA IN REGARDS TO RACE?

I think that my dream is to have a world where color doesn’t matter. That we celebrate our differences in skin color, hair, eye shape, culture, etc. instead of judging each other.

 

ANYTHING ELSE YOU WANT TO SHARE?

Being mixed shows a coming together. We are all so unique and beautiful. We need to celebrate that instead of bashing each other so much!


You can follow Anna on IG and also her business account where she created custom, hand painted letters for kid’s rooms and nurseries!

Image is from Anna's Etsy page, click photo to go to page! 
Image is from Anna’s Etsy page, click photo to go to page! 

 

SLAVERY IN 2016? AVA DUVERNAY’S DOCUMENTARY “13TH”


Ava DuVernay, Director
Ava DuVernay, Director

I don’t watch a lot of documentaries, but my two younger sisters desperately urged me to watch “13th” on Netflix, directed by Ava DuVernay. I knew she had directed Selma, so I figured the documentary would be pretty good. I truly had no idea just how good it would be.

 

The documentary is based around, and named for, the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which abolished slavery. The amendment was ratified in 1865 and stated: “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.” Somehow, I never really thought about the clause right in the middle of that sentence, “except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.”

 

DuVernay’s documentary focuses in on that clause and details how she, and many others, believe that it is the reason so many African American men and other people of color are currently in our nation’s prison systems. She interviews scholars, white and black, and others who substantiate this claim with very convincing evidence. They all agree that the clause has basically allowed slavery to continue under the guise of keeping “criminals” behind bars.

 

I’ve known for many years that our prison system is broken and in need of a desperate overhaul, but I truly didn’t realize the extent of it until I watched “13th”. I also didn’t realize the degree in which our prisons are systematically and calculatedly filled. Listening to the people interviewed talk about how vastly interconnected the prisons are to huge corporations and political organizations was mind blowing and also extremely disheartening; especially given our current political climate in the wake of the presidential election.  

“13th” is an incredibly powerful film and I think DuVernay excellently weaves her claim into the broader picture of current race relations in the US. It truly speaks to a lot of the issues African Americans and people of color are dealing with today and, in my opinion, is a must watch for everyone. Regardless of the opinions or conclusions you come to after watching, it assure you it will have made you think a little harder about why so many African Americans are imprisoned and why so many people of color are continually and systematically disenfranchised.


 

 

 

 

THINGS MULTIRACIAL PEOPLE AND OUR MONORACIAL PARENTS CAN’T STAND HEARING


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“She’s so pretty … where did she come from?” is one of many obnoxious questions Chris Kelly is routinely asked about her Biracial (half White and half African American) daughter.

 

It got me thinking about the questions people have asked both my parents and me about my brothers’ and my ambiguous looks. And while I don’t believe all multiracial people and our monoracial parents experience all of these questions, my bet is that many can resonate with this list.

 

And before your White fragility forces you to express how insulted you are that I am addressing this, try and remove yourselves from the equation and think about how your invasiveness, your lack of imagination, your inability to think before you speak, your insensitivity and your ability to personalize everything affects us. Please.

 

Questions and Declarations Multiracial People are Tired of Hearing

 

You’re So Exotic!

People, please! I am not a Chia Pet! While you may think this is a compliment, it’s not. My appearance may be different from yours, but that’s all it is—different. It’s not exotic. I am the product of my parents’ relationship the same way you are. We don’t need to make it more or less than it is.

 

Can I Touch Your Hair?

No! If you’re still unsure why, refer to the discussion on me not being a Chia Pet.

 

Stop Fetishizing Us!

It’s not unusual for people to have a type when looking for a partner. I like men to be of similar height, weight and build. I also like them to be on the introverted and shy side. They need to be intellectual, funny, think outside the box and nonconformists. As far as what race they are, by the time I was in my 20s I was tired of men fetishizing me—White, Black, Latino, Hispanic and Asian men did this to me.

I fell in love with my husband because he never once saw me as more beautiful because my ambiguous looks. He is monoracial and like him, we’d both previously dated people who spanned the rainbow.

 

I Have a Friend Who’s Biracial. Do You Know Her?

While you may feel it’s safe to stick to your kind, I have friends who are both monoracial and multiracial. I don’t choose or not choose my friends based on that one commonality we have. Difficult though it may be to believe, we have other things in common that bring us together and moreover, I don’t know every Biracial person out there.

 

There is Only One Race: The Human Race

 This one is tricky because on the face of it, it’s true. The difference in human beings is far tinier than one might believe looking at obvious physical differences. And race is indeed a social construct, however, as long as people are treated differently based solely on skin color, we aren’t even close to making that claim yet.

Don’t get me started on examples, but I’ll give you a hint:

·      Cops using Blacks, Latinos, Hispanics and Natives as target practice

·      People of Color (PoC) incarcerated at disproportionate rates than Whites

·      Whites crossing the street when they see a PoC

 

I Don’t See Color

This one is particularly annoying. Really? You see no difference between the blue skies, the green leaves on trees, the yellow sun and so on? No, I didn’t think so. Admitting to seeing color isn’t the same as discriminating against or making judgments about because of color.

 

What Kind of Music Do Multiracial People Listen To?

Do I really have to explain why this question is stupid and obnoxious? We listen to whatever appeals to us, the same way monoracial people do. Are we swayed one way or another because we’re more than one race? That answer is very complex and relates to bigger issues of who we are on the inside vs. what you see on the outside.

 

Like monoracial people, I like the music I do because of the way I was raised, the environment (both in my home and outside my home) I was exposed to and my personality. I can listen to folk, hard rock, hip hop, salsa, classical and jazz and this variation may or may not have anything to do with my races.

 


Questions and Declarations Monoracial Parents of Multiracial Kids are Tired of Hearing

 

Are You the Nanny?

Author Sarah Ratliff and her father
Author Sarah Ratliff and her father

My mother was half Black and half Japanese and my father was White. We all got tired of people asking that same stupid question. It is actually possible my parents fell in love and made babies. The question is racist and grounded in colonization / imperialism. Would you think of asking a White parent of a multiracial / ambiguous looking child if she were the nanny?

 

And How Did You Meet Him?

This is a subtle one because the question doesn’t appear racist but when the emphasis is on the you and the him it is. The inference being my parents were in different social stratospheres. Had the question been, “how did you two meet?” it would be far less offensive because it assumes they are both equals vs. one having superiority over the other. It works in reverse if the question is, “how did you meet her?”

 

So You’re Into (fill in the blank) Women / Men? What’s Wrong With…?

Personality traits, temperaments and whether someone is introverted or extroverted are what attracted you to your partner, no? Why would you assume it’s different for someone who fell in love with a person who’s a different race?

That you feel the need to question someone else’s choices seems like a personal problem. Get over it.

Have You Thought About How Society Will See Your Children?

That’s usually code for, “I am a well-intentioned racist and I am uncomfortable with your choice to marry outside your race and have children with this person.”

Well, that’s a personal problem, ain’t it?

 

What are some of yours? 


PODCAST WITH MULTIRACIAL PHOTOGRAPHER AND DIRECTOR SUZIE STRONG


We are very excited that Alex of Multiracial Media recently interviewed photographer and director Suzie Strong for his podcast, Multiracial Family ManSwirl Nation Blog first featured Suzie as a Featured Multiracial Individual back in May. I personally met Suzie earlier this year when she showed her art in an art show that I was lucky enough to curate. Take some time to listen to the podcast here and get to know Suzie better! 

You can take a look at her work here and on IG.


More information can be found here

Ep. 92: Suzie Strong is an award-winning, Los Angeles-based photographer and director.  In her photography work, she specializes in creative portraits and fashion.  She directs and shoots feature films, short narratives, music videos, experimental shorts, promos and fashion shorts.

Suzie also has a fascinating multiracial heritage, with Lebanese, German, Irish, English, Spanish, & Native American roots.  Interestingly, her family immigrated to the United States through New Orleans, rather than Ellis Island, and her family culture and traditions mainly reflect the culture of New Orleans which Suzie calls “a beautiful quilt of many types of people.”  She adds: “Our home was always a southern island on the west coast. We also honored our Lebanese background with lots of Lebanese cooking!“

Listen as Suzie explains her Lebanese (and other) roots and the juxtaposition of those with New Orleans culture.  And, hear how her ancestry and heritage have informed her life and work.

YUKO KUDO – I AM ME

I Am Me! What strong wonderful words. They make a simple phrase, yet say so much. My wonderful friend Yuko Kudo came up with that phrase, well maybe she didn’t exactly come up with it, but she has used the phrase to create a movement.

Yuko is from Japan and considers herself a Japanese person that comes in a fun size. She loves people more than anything and considers loving people her superpower. I can attest that this is indeed the case. She has a vision where everyone in the world celebrates their authenticity. I believe Yuko can achieve this dream!

She is an Artist, Actor, Singer, Photographer, Writer, Essential Oil Enthusiast, Yoga Teacher, Entrepreneur, and a student of life. Or simply put, a renaissance woman.

Alex – How did you come up with the “I Am Me” project?

Yuko – It might sound cliche but it came to me during a meditation one day, soon after I left my day job at the restaurant. It was loud and clear. I didn’t know what exactly I needed to do, but I knew that I was called to do this. In the beginning, I didn’t notice. But what I notice now is that this was not only for others to celebrate their authenticity, it was also for me. I was afraid of being who I am when I grew up. I was trying not to stand out, trying not to share my stories, trying not to be me . . . I wasn’t able to say “I AM ME.”

When I started how people don’t see what I see, it made me sad. People don’t know how beautiful they are, how talented they are, how worthy they are. They are afraid of how other people see them, how people judge and criticize them, or to own their light and power. I wanted to scream, and I did for a number of times, that “YOU ARE BEAUTIFUL INSIDE and OUT.”

“You are more than enough”

“You are who you are for a specific reason and there’s no mistake.”

“Your story matters, your voice matters”

And I wanted them to get it. As much as this is everybody’s journey, this is also my journey. I want to be able to own my light, my power, my story. So, that’s my story. The continuous journey of owning this one simple phrase, “I AM ME,” and celebrating that every moment.

I believe in Yuko and her project so much! I even participated. It was empowering and a wonderful experience, and you too can join in! Yuko is looking to spread her message!

Please visit her website for more info!

IG // FB // TW

 


Growing up Half Mexican and Half Chinese


Photo by Kierston Clark
Photo by Kierston Clark

So I’ve been working on my documentary, Mixed Up, a little bit over a year. The film is centered on parenting someone of a different race. We’ve conducted over 70 interviews with interracial couples and their bi/multiracial children, as well as interracial families brought together by adoption, to ask about their understanding of their racial identity.

 

When talking about multiethnicity, most of the existing literature focuses on the experience of folks who are half black and half white. We had the opportunity to speak with Joseph Acez on his experience growing up half Mexican and half Chinese. In this interview he speaks on what it is like growing up as a second generation immigrant,  assimilation, and other observations related to race   relations. Double minority is the term for someone who is mixed with two minority races in the United States.  

 

Q: Do you feel like you have more diluted sense of culture because you are biracial?

Joseph: I feel like my sense of being Mexican or Chinese are both diluted because I live in America. My parents also didn’t want me to stick out like a sore thumb so they really wanted me to embrace the American culture and fit in. Any interest I had in my culture mostly came from me being interested in the things about being Mexican and Chinese, rather than my parents instilling it in me.

 

Q: What challenges have you come across in relation to your multiethnicity?

Joseph: I was with my black friend the other day and we went somewhere and we were with a lot of black people and he said ‘this is great. We’re with a lot of black people; I’m comfortable.’ In that moment I realized I’m never going to run into a bunch of people who are half Mexican and half Chinese and feel “comfortable”.

 

Q: Do your parents have any opinions about your dating life?

Joseph: Growing up, my parents made sure that I knew I could date anyone outside of my race. They also let me know that they had troubles being together and that people didn’t want them to be together. Not just each other’s family, but people in general would think it was strange. They told me that I should be able to date whoever I wanted to date so it was never a thing for me.

 

Q: Is it possible to assimilate and hold onto your culture?

Joseph: My parents came from Mexico and China. They were poor so they came here to try to make a better life for themselves and they did which was great but while they were doing it they didn’t have fun because they were both immigrants and they didn’t fit in. You go to America and it’s your new home but it doesn’t feel like home. It’s interesting my dad has a Spanish accent when he speaks English but he has an English accent when he speaks Spanish because he’s lived here for so long. Same thing with my mom. What they wanted was for me to be very comfortable wherever I grew up, that’s why they didn’t teach me Spanish or Chinese, which I wish they did. Their hope was that I wouldn’t have to deal with any of the feelings of being an outsider.

About the Author.

Mixed Up: The Documentary is an interactive investigation into the parental influence of racial identity development in children of interracial families. Follow us to keep up with our progress FB: Mixed Up Documentary  @mixedupdocu  


How two Persian millennials remain culturally connected while playing by their own rules


So I’ve been working on my documentary, Mixed Up, a little bit over a year. The film is centered on parenting someone of a different race. We’ve conducted over 70 interviews with interracial couples and their bi/multiracial children, as well as interracial families brought together by adoption, to ask about their understanding of their racial identity. Over the course of this year, I’ve become extremely interested in racial identity as a whole. Who are you? How do other people see you? Are the two related?

Every now and again I like to take my camera and rome the streets of Los Angeles to explore people’s experience in relation to identity and race. On this particular trip, I had a chance to talk to two Canadians visiting L.A., Silver Lucia (right) and Jay Changizi (left). They speak on remaining culturally connected and not allowing themselves to be defined by mainstream stereotypes.

Q: How do you feel you’re portrayed in the media?

JC: I hate how people talk about Muslims. I mean we are such an easy scapegoat everytime something happens. I remember when 9/11 happened I was in college and first I freaked out because, even though we are in Canada we all feel like we are on one soil. My second fear was they are going to stick this on us and I knew right away that my life as a Middle Eastern would never be the same .

SL: When you meet people and you tell them your Persian they are like ‘people are crazy over there.’ That’s always the only thing people say. People are not crazy they just put everyone in the same boat. It’s who is on top. It’s the government. It’s the dictator. It’s not us and people just don’t see the difference.

JC: You’re taking the most impoverished area and saying that is what represents the entire country. Imagine taking the most impoverished backwoods hillbilly Americans and saying ‘this is what represents all of the U.S. so don’t go there or don’t deal with them.’

 

Q: Do you feel the pressure to assimilate?

SL: I’m so proud to tell people I am Iranian, I am Persian and people like it. Most of the time it’s like omgosh your Persian and it’s only stupid people who are like ‘aww your Arabic well you guys are all the same to me.’ I will never lie about who I am to different people ever.

JG: I think there’s different experiences because living through 9/11 as an adult and trying to travel and trying to get around, I felt that there was pressure to make a little bit of a concession on who I was at times. Before coming here, one of the first things my mother told me is “shave your beard. Don’t try to pass the border with a beard.  Don’t say anything. Don’t get in anyone’s way.” There is always this idea of we will be the first to be pegged or pulled to the side and put into some kind of trouble.

SL: I’m never gonna change for anyone and I’m never going to lie for anyone. I feel like I integrate well. I’m not causing trouble to anyone. I’m really open minded. I don’t think I’m doing anything wrong. So if people want to judge me because I am Persian that’s their issue not mine.

JG: I think they judge you because you have tattoos.

 

Q: Do you think there’s a cultural generational gap between younger Persians, growing up in America and those who have immigrated here at an older age?

JG: I think it’s really funny because I have a younger cousin about 10 or 12 years younger than me and he speaks better farcy than I do and listens to Persian music. Where as me growing up, we were first generation immigrants and I tried to assimilate as much as possible. My cousin, being born here, he’s like I am Canadian so the prime objective is to become persian.

About the Author.

Mixed Up: The Documentary is an interactive investigation into the parental influence of racial identity development in children of interracial families. Follow us to keep up with our progress FB: Mixed Up Documentary  @mixedupdocu


THE UNITED STATE OF WOMEN


Some of the most accomplished women in our country, led by the First Lady Michelle Obama, have come together to launch a movement, a summit, The United State of Women. The website states:

There’s a lot that’s been done by and for women and girls, but there’s still plenty to do. Convened by the White House, this Summit will rally all of us together to celebrate what we’ve achieved, and how we’re going to take action moving forward. Covering key gender equality issues, we’ll make a powerful difference in our collective future.

Watch this video starring heavyweights from Hollywood and the business world to learn more about The Summit which is scheduled for June 14 and it will delve into topics like education opportunity, violence against women and civic leadership.

There will also be a campaign leading up to the summit also invites people to pledge to fight wage inequality and sexism in other forms. Regional events will also be held for people not able to travel to the event in Washington D.C. 

The core focus of The Summit is eliminating structural sexism.

TOGETHER, we got this. 


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